An owl is any of some 200+ species of solitary nocturnal birds of prey in the order Strigiformes. Owls mostly hunt small mammals, insects, and other birds, though a few species specialize in hunting fish. They are found on all the Earth's land except for Antarctica, most of Greenland, and some remote islands. Owls have large forward-facing eyes and ears, a hawk-like beak, and a conspicuous circle of feathers around each eye called the facial disk. Although owls have binocular vision, their large eyes are fixed in their sockets, and they must turn their entire heads to change views. Owls are far-sighted, and are unable to clearly see anything within a few inches of their eyes. However, their vision, particularly in low light, is excellent.













Page1| Page 2 | Page 3 | Page 4


Many owls can also hunt by sound in total darkness. The facial disc helps to funnel the sound of rodents to their ears, which are widely spaced and, in some species, placed asymmetrically, for better directional location. Despite their appearance, owls are more closely related to whippoorwills and other nightjars or Caprimulgiformes than to hawks and other diurnal predators (see Falconiformes). Some taxonomists place the nightjars in the same order as owls, as in the Sibley-Ahlquist taxonomy. Owls' powerful clawed feet and sharp beak let them tear their prey to pieces before eating. Their muffled wings and dull feathers allow them to fly almost silently and unseen.

Owls Images:
001-014.jpg courtesy US Fish and Wildlife Service
015-016.jpg courtesy: National Undersea Research Program
017-018.jpg courtesy: U.S. Bureau of Land Management
19-24 Courtesy of The NRCS



Aligator
Dinosaur
Frog
Komodo Dragon
Lizard
Sea Turtle
Snake
Toad
Tortoise
Turtle
MORE...


Carp
Catfish
Crab
Crayfish
Eel
Largemouth Bass
Lobster
Minnow
Pike
Octopus
Perch
Salmon
Sea Horse
Starfish
Stingray
Sunfish
Trout
Tuna
MORE...









All text contained in Animaltrek.com is licensed to the public under the GNU Free Documentation License (GFDL). All Information is courtesy of Wikipedia.
Copyrights | Privacy Policy | © 2005 FUN GROUP INC.