The Common Crossbill (Loxia curvirostra) is a small passerine bird in the finch family Fringillidae. It breeds in the spruce forests of North America, where it is known as Red Crossbill, Europe and Asia; some populations (different species?) breed in pine forests in certain areas of all three continents, and in North America, also in douglas-fir. It nests in conifers, laying 3-5 eggs. This crossbill is mainly resident, but will regularly erupts south if its food source fails. This species will form flocks outside the breeding season, often mixed with other crossbills. The crossbills are characterised by the mandibles crossing at their tips, which gives the group its English name. They are specialist feeders on conifer cones, particularly the various spruce species but also some populations (different species?) in douglas-fir and various pine species, and the unusual bill shape is an adaptation to assist the extraction of the seeds from the cone.










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Adult males tend to be red or orange in colour, and females green or yellow, but there is much variation. This species is difficult to separate from Parrot Crossbill and Scottish Crossbill, both of which breed within its Eurasian range. The identification problem is less severe in North America, where only Red Crossbill and White-winged Crossbill occur. Plumage distinctions from Parrot and Scottish Crossbills are negligible. The head and bill are smaller than in either of the other species. Care is needed to identify this species. The glip or chup call is probably the best indicator. Work on vocalisation in North America suggest that, in that continent alone, there are eight or nine populations of Red Crossbill with different calls, which rarely if ever interbreed. These forms also vary in terms of bill size and structure, and specialise on the seed cones of different species of conifer.

Above Images Come From The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service











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