Carp, native to Eurasia, were introduced into North America to great fanfare as "the world's finest fish" in 1877. The original shipment of 345 live fish were released in ponds in Druid Hill Park in Boston, later surplus populations were released in Babcock Lakes in Monument Park, Washington, D.C.. This was a project of Rudolf Hessel, a fish culturist in the employ of the United States Government. There was substantial favorable publicity and carp were widely introduced throughout the United States.













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Results of the introduction of this exotic species seemed at first promising as carp readily adapted to their new environment, spreading rapidly thoughout any drainage area they were introduced to. One of the myths about carp is that they eat pond vegetation. They do, but in very limited amounts. They are also claimed to eat the spawn of other fish, this is fallacious as there is absolutely no evidence of this happening. Tales of carp muddying waters are true, however it is doubtful that they can make water turbid enough to be harmful to other fish. While tasty when grown in good water, they can be riddled with small bones in unpredictable locations. Despite having food and angling value that is celebrated in most parts of the world, in the US and Australia carp are viewed unfavorably. Carp have taken much of the blame for the loss of native species in the US. However, native fish populations were suffering even before introduction of carp.

Above Images Are From The U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service













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