'Ambersweet' orangesAll citrus trees are of a single genus, Citrus, and remain largely interbreedable; that is, there is only one "superspecies" which includes lemons and limes as well as oranges. Nevertheless names have been given to the various members of the citrus family, oranges often being referred to as Citrus sinensis and Citrus aurantium. All members of the genus Citrus are considered berries because they have many seeds, are fleshy, soft and derive from a single ovary. A number of cultivars of orange are now cultivated widely. The sweet orange (Citrus x aurantium) was first grown in Spain, and has become the most popular variety. The sweet orange will grow to different sizes and colors due to local conditions, most commonly with ten carpels (slices) inside.















Page1| Page 2



Navel oranges with various sized navels.A single mutation in an orchard of sweet oranges planted at a monastery in 1820 in Brazil led to the navel orange (aka Washington, Riverside or Bahia navel). A single cutting of the original was then transplanted to Riverside, California in 1870, creating a new market worldwide. The mutation caused a 'twin' fruit, with a smaller orange embedded in the outer fruit opposite the stem. From the outside the smaller, undeveloped, twin leaves a human navel-like formation at the top of the fruit. Navel oranges are almost always seedless, and tend to be larger than the sweet orange. They are produced without pollination (parthenocarpy).

Above Images Are from The U.S.D.A.






Aligator
Dinosaur
Frog
Komodo Dragon
Lizard
Sea Turtle
Snake
Toad
Tortoise
Turtle
MORE...


Carp
Catfish
Crab
Crayfish
Eel
Largemouth Bass
Lobster
Minnow
Pike
Octopus
Perch
Salmon
Sea Horse
Starfish
Stingray
Sunfish
Trout
Tuna
MORE...









All text contained in Animaltrek.com is licensed to the public under the GNU Free Documentation License (GFDL). All Information is courtesy of Wikipedia.
Copyrights | Privacy Policy | © 2005 FUN GROUP INC.