Mosquitos are the members of the family Culicidae; these insects have a pair of scaled wings, a pair of halteres, a slender body, and long legs. The females of most mosquito species suck blood from other animals. Size varies but is rarely greater than 15 mm (0.6 inches). Mosquitoes weigh only about 2 to 2.5 mg (0.03 to 0.04 grains). They can fly at about 1.5 to 2.5 km/h (0.9 to 1.6 mph). Mosquitoes have been around for 170 million years. The family Culicidae belongs to the order Diptera and contains about 2700 species in about 35 genera including Anopheles, Culex, Psorophora, Ochlerotatus, Aedes, Sabethes, Wyeomyia, Culiseta, and Haemagoggus.










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"Mosquito" is a Spanish or Portuguese word meaning little fly, and its use dates back to about 1583.
In most female mosquitoes, the mouth parts form a long proboscis for piercing the skin of mammals (or in some cases birds or even reptiles and amphibians) to suck their blood. The females require protein for egg development, and since the normal mosquito diet consists of nectar and fruit juice, which has no protein, most must drink blood to get the necessary protein. Males differ from females, with mouth parts not suitable for blood sucking. There is one genus of mosquitoes, Toxorhynchites, that never drinks blood. The larvae of these large mosquitoes are predatory on other mosquito larvae. In most female mosquitoes, the mouth parts form a long proboscis for piercing the skin of mammals (or in some cases birds or even reptiles and amphibians) to suck their blood. The females require protein for egg development, and since the normal mosquito diet consists of nectar and fruit juice, which has no protein, most must drink blood to get the necessary protein. Males differ from females, with mouth parts not suitable for blood sucking.


Above Images Are From The U.S.D.A.





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