Ticks are often found in tall grass, where they will rest themselves at the tip of a blade so as to attach themselves to a passing animal or human. They will generally drop off of the animal when full, but this may take several days. Ticks contain a structure in their mouth area that allows them to anchor themselves firmly in place while sucking blood. Pulling a tick out forcefully out from under the skin often leaves the head behind, which may result in infection. Methods for removing a tick without it leaving its mouthpiece inside the skin include anesthezing the tick with a substance such as ether.



 
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Dermacentor variabilis, the American dog tick, is perhaps the most well-known of the North American hard ticks. Ixodes dammini, the deer tick, is common to the eastern part of North America and is known for spreading Lyme disease. A close cousin of I. dammini, Ixodes pacificus lives in the western part of the continent and is responsible for spreading Lyme disease and the more deadly Rocky Mountain spotted fever. I. pacificus tends to prefer livestock as its adult host.

Above Images Come From The USDA





























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