North American elk are the largest of the red deer, similar in size to, or slightly larger than, the Russian maral. The American elk terminology is different from the European, as the males are called bulls, the females are called cows, and the offspring are calves, rather than stags, hinds, and fawns. The vocal apparatus and mating call of the elk is also different from red deer, in that the elk "bugle" as opposed to "roaring". This is an adaptation to the more open (less thickly wooded) environment of the elk, allowing high-pitched sounds to travel further.













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Dominant bulls herd groups of cows during the rut, from August into early winter. The bulls may have as many as 50 cows to keep from other less fortunate males. After the rut the stags and hinds separate. The fawns are born the following June and are usually weaned by eight months, although they may stay with their mother after this time. The newborn fawns are left by their mothers for long periods in long vegetation; their mothers return at intervals to feed them.

Above Images Come From The US Fish & Wildlife Service




















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