Pumas are gradually extending their range to the east, following creeks and riverbeds, and have reached Missouri and Michigan. It is anticipated that they will soon expand their range over the entire eastern and southern United States. There are continuing reports of the survival of a remnant population of the Eastern Cougar in New Brunswick and the Gaspé Peninsula of Quebec. Due to urbanization in the urban-wildland interface, pumas often come into contact with people, especially in areas with a large population of deer, their natural prey. They have also begun preying on pets, such as dogs and cats, and livestock, but have rarely turned to people as a source of food. There are an estimated 4,000 to 6,000 pumas in California and an estimated 4,500 to 5,000 pumas in Colorado.














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Puma, photographed in the Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum, Tucson, Arizona/ Physical characteristics Pumas are tawny-colored with black-tipped ears and tail. The puma can run as fast as 30 mph (50 km/h), jump 20 ft (6 m) from a standing position, vertically leap 8 ft (2.5 m), and often weigh more than 150 pounds (70 kg). Their bite strength is more powerful than that of any domestic dog. Puma claws are retractable and they have four toes. Adult males may be more than eight feet long (nose to tail), and weigh about 150 pounds (70 kg). In exceptional cases males may reach as much as 200 pounds. Adult females can be 7 ft (2 m) long and weigh about 75 pounds (35 kg). Puma kittens have brownish-blackish spots and rings on their tails. Their life span is about a decade in the wild and 25 years or more in captivity. The pumas that live closest to the Equator are the smallest, and increase in size in populations closer to the poles.

Above Images Come From The National Parks Service






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