Rabbits are an example of an animal which is treated as both food and pet by the same culture. Snares or guns are usually employed when catching wild rabbits for food. Dogs are often employed in rabbit hunting. Rabbits are often raised for meat, a practice called cuniculture. Rabbit pelts are a widely used fur for clothing. Because of their appetites, and the rate at which they breed, wild rabbit depredation can prove problematic for agriculture. Gassing, barriers (fences), shooting, snaring and ferreting have been used to control rabbit populations, as has the disease myxomatosis.














Page1| Page 2



The only rabbit to be domesticated is the European Rabbit. These rabbits have been extensively domesticated for food or as a pet. Domesticated Rabbits have mostly been bred to be much larger than wild rabbits, though selective breeding has produced a wide range of breeds which are kept as pets and food animals across the world. They have as much color variation among themselves as other household pets. Their fur is prized for its softness, and even today Angora rabbits are raised for their long soft fur, which is often spun into yarn. Other breeds are raised for the fur industry, particularly the Rex, which has a smooth velvet like coat and comes in a wide variety of colors and sizes. In the middle-size breeds, the teeth grow approximately 125 mm (5 in) per year for the upper incisors and about 200 mm (8 in) per year for the lower incisors. The teeth abrade away against one another, giving the teeth a constantly sharp edge.

Images 1 & 2 Are Courtesy Of Fun Group Inc.
Images 3 & 4 Are CourtesyOf pdphoto.org
Image Number 5 Is Courtesy Of The U.S. Bureau of Land Management
Images 6 Through 12 Is Courtesy Of The U.S.D.A.








Aligator
Dinosaur
Frog
Komodo Dragon
Lizard
Sea Turtle
Snake
Toad
Tortoise
Turtle
MORE...


Carp
Catfish
Crab
Crayfish
Eel
Largemouth Bass
Lobster
Minnow
Pike
Octopus
Perch
Salmon
Sea Horse
Starfish
Stingray
Sunfish
Trout
Tuna
MORE...









All text contained in Animaltrek.com is licensed to the public under the GNU Free Documentation License (GFDL). All Information is courtesy of Wikipedia.
Copyrights | Privacy Policy | © 2005 FUN GROUP INC.