The Red Fox (Vulpes vulpes), the most familiar of the foxes, has the widest range of any terrestrial carnivore. The largest species within the genus Vulpes, Red Foxes have a native range spanning most of North America and Eurasia, with several populations in North Africa. In the 19th century the Red Fox was introduced into Australia with dire results. It is now thought to be the most destructive of feral species on that continent, responsible for more damage than both feral cats and rabbits, see also fox. Red Foxes have both positive and negative standing with humans; while they are vectors of disease and a bane of poultry farmers, these foxes are also important to the fur industry. A prominent cultural impact is that of fox hunting, a long-practised but now controversial British tradition.














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A subspecies, the Japanese Red Fox (Vulpes vulpes japonica) migrated from India to China and eventually to Japan. It is also known by the Japanese name kitsune. Red foxes are most commonly a rusty red, with white underbelly and black ear tips and legs. The "red" tone can vary from crimson to golden, and in fact can be brindled or agouti, with bands of red, brown, black and white on each individual hair when seen close up. In the wild, two other color phases are also seen: silver or black (silver foxes, comprising 10% of the wild population and most of the farmed), and a more common variant, the so-called "cross fox", named for the black stripes running across its shoulders and down its back and forming a "cross" on an otherwise red background. "Domesticated" or farmed stock may be almost any color, including spotted, or "marbled", varieties.

Above Images Come From The US Fish & Wildlife Service








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