Snakes are cold blooded legless reptiles closely related to lizards, which share the order Squamata. There are also several species of legless lizard which superficially resemble snakes, but are not otherwise related to them. A love of snakes is called ophiophilia. An old synonym for snake is serpent; in modern usage this usually refers to a mythic or symbolic snake, and information about such creatures will be found under serpent. This article deals with the biology of snakes.














Page1| Page 2



All snakes are carnivorous, eating small animals (including lizards and other snakes), birds, eggs or insects. Some snakes have a venomous bite which they use to kill their prey before eating it. Other snakes kill their prey by constriction resulting in death by strangulation. Snakes do not chew their food. Snakes have a very flexible lower jaw, the two halves of which are not rigidly attached, and numerous other joints in their skull (see snake skull), allowing them to open their mouths wide enough to swallow their prey whole, even if it is larger in diameter than the snake itself. Contrary to the popular myth, at no point do they "unhinge" their jaws (disarticulate their mandibular joints). After eating, snakes become torpid while the process of digestion takes place. Digestion is an intensive activity, especially after the consumption of very large prey, and so much metabolic energy is involved that Crotalus durissus, the Mexican rattlesnake, may actually raise its body temperature as much as 6 degrees above the surrounding environment. Because of this, a snake disturbed after having eaten recently will often regurgitate the prey in order to be able to escape the perceived threat. However, when undisturbed, the digestive process is highly efficient, dissolving and absorbing everything but hair and claws, which are excreted along with uric acid waste.

Above Images Are From The US Fish & Wildlife Service




Aligator
Dinosaur
Frog
Komodo Dragon
Lizard
Sea Turtle
Snake
Toad
Tortoise
Turtle
MORE...


Carp
Catfish
Crab
Crayfish
Eel
Largemouth Bass
Lobster
Minnow
Pike
Octopus
Perch
Salmon
Sea Horse
Starfish
Stingray
Sunfish
Trout
Tuna
MORE...









All text contained in Animaltrek.com is licensed to the public under the GNU Free Documentation License (GFDL). All Information is courtesy of Wikipedia.
Copyrights | Privacy Policy | © 2005 FUN GROUP INC.